PAUL'S WHISK(E)Y MINIATURE WORLD LOGO

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Latest update: June 24th2015

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3dflagsdotcom_uksco_2fawsSPEYBURN DISTILLERY PICTURES

SPEYBURN DISTILLERY VISIT 2012

The pictures in the slide show at the left, were taken by Frans Brouwer The Whisky Friend. The pictures are used with kind permission from him.

logo the whisky friend

 

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Founded in 1964, Inver House is an independent Scottish based company. Within their portfolio are 5 distilleries - Pulteney, Balblair, Knockdhu, Speyburn and Balmenach - each producing its own distinctive, individual single malt whisky. 

There are many beautifully situated distilleries in Scotland but few can surpass the sight of Speyburn sitting majestically in a corner of the Spey valley at the foot of the densely wooded hills on the outskirts of the quiet Highland town of Rothes. Designed by the famous distillery architect, Charles Doig of Elgin, Speyburn is reputed to be the most photographed distillery in Scotland. The most distinctive feature of Speyburn is its two and three storey buildings which use the sloping three acre site to best effect. With its impressive elevations and traditional pagoda stretching skywards, to this day Speyburn still commands an imposing aspect in the Glen of Rothes.

In 1997 Speyburn celebrated its centenary but, in its time, it was considered an extremely modern distillery with 'all the latest and most approved appliances of plant and machinery, no expense being spared and every care taken in construction to ensure smoothmess of working'. This fact was made evident by the installation of the first ever steam powered mechanical maltings in Scotland which ran for ninety years. Even after the maltings were converted to electricity in the 1940's, the boiler was maintained by the 'mashman' in case of a power failure. The manager at that time was heard to comment that the boiler 'was polished to high heaven, not with oil, but with fine emery paper: you could use it as a shaving mirror'.